Ag Pesticide Waste Collection – Wharton

MEDIA ADVISORY

Contact: Corrie Bowen – Texas A&M AgriLife Extension
cbowen@ag.tamu.edu – 979-532-3310

 

 Unwanted Agricultural Surplus pesticides? Dispose of them properly!

Unused pesticides lurking in barns and outbuildings are hazardous to people, pets and the environment.

Currently, there is no organized collection activity to allow Texans to responsibly dispose of their unwanted agricultural pesticide waste. This has caused many Texans to accumulate unwanted pesticides under unsafe storage conditions and has possibly caused some to consider illegal disposal options. The improper disposal of agricultural pesticide waste poses a serious risk to surface and groundwater, wildlife habitat, and other areas of the environment.

However, agricultural pesticide waste collection events provide a safe and legal method for disposing of agricultural pesticides and containers.

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, in collaboration with the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) is facilitating an “Agricultural Waste Pesticide Collection Event”, Wednesday, November 28th at the Wharton County Fairgrounds near Wharton, Texas, located at 6036 FM 961 Road.  The collection will run from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., and is open to all TDA licensed agricultural Private Applicators in Wharton and surrounding counties.

This free collection, conducted rain or shine, will give agricultural producers who use pesticides in Texas an opportunity to dispose of unwanted products that may pose a hazard to them, their families, and their communities.

The following items will be accepted:

  • outdated, discontinued or unwanted agricultural pesticides, including insecticides, herbicides and fungicides, rodenticides, nematicides, and growth regulators
  • empty, triple-rinsed plastic pesticide containers
  • empty or partial metal drums

PESTICIDES MUST BE KEPT IN THEIR ORIGINAL CONTAINERS, EVEN IF THE LABEL IS NOT PRESENT

Unknown pesticides will be sampled and identified on site.

 

Do NOT bring:

  • explosive ordnances and ammunition
  • petroleum-based products
  • paints
  • medical wastes
  • radioactive substances
  • household pesticides and chemicals
  • tires
  • fertilizers, propane or butane cylinders
  • dioxins
  • 2,4-5T
  • chlorinated Hydrocarbons (chlordane, aldrin, dieldrin, and heptachlor)
  • fumigant canisters
  • Used motor oil and other automobile fluids
  • Used motor oil filters
  • Auto batteries
  • Household hazardous waste such as paints, thinners, antifreeze, aerosol cans, mercury thermometers, photographic chemicals, herbicides and cleaners, petroleum products, antifreeze, and fluorescent bulbs
  • Empty bulk containers

 

Contact the Wharton County Extension Office at 979-532-3310 to inquire about any special requests for assistance.

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Corrie Bowen, MS
County Extension Agent – Agriculture
Wharton County
315 E. Milam, Suite 112
Wharton, Texas 77488
(979) 532-3310

TDA Blanket Extension of Cotton Stalk Destruction Deadline

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TDA Blanket Extension of Cotton Stalk Destruction Deadline for Pest Management Zone 3

 

From the Desk of Corrie Bowen, County Extension Agent – Wharton County

 

Early this morning I received information from TDA regarding a cotton stalk destruction extension to the October 31st deadline for Zone 3.  I want to pass this along to our cotton industry in a timely manner.

 

The Texas Department of Agriculture has received written requests to extend the cotton stalk destruction deadline for Zone 3.  This requests has come from the Cotton Producer Advisory Committee for Zone 3.

After consideration of this request the Department has decided to grant the cotton stalk destruction deadline extension for all of Pest Management Zone 3 until November 17, 2018.

Pest Management Zone 3 consists of Austin, Brazoria, Chambers, Colorado, Fayette, Fort Bend, Galveston, Gonzales, Harris, Jackson, Jefferson, Lavaca, Liberty, Matagorda, Orange, Waller, and Wharton counties.

 

Basis for Extension

 

Pest Management Zone 3 has received repeated above average rainfall for the last several weeks and current weather predictions indicate additional rainfall, which will continue to delay field operations.

 

Authority

Section 20.22 of the Texas Administrative Code provides that the Department may grant a blanket extension of the destruction deadline covering an entire cotton stalk destruction zone or a portion of an entire zone under certain circumstances.

 

Attached, please find the Department’s Blanket Extension Summary Table for your information. The following link shows the cotton stalk destruction map with zones and destruction deadlines. http://texasagriculture.gov/Portals/0/images/ACP/Cotton/CSD%20Zones%20300%20dpi.pdf

 

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Blanket Extensions Summary Table 2018

Bike and Blend Nov 13

Join us to “Bike and Blend” on November 13, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. at the El Campo Library. There will be a Cancer Prevention Cooking School follow up as well as FREE smoothies and a chance to win a FREE FITBIT. Please RSVP by November 8 by contacting Renee Harrell at 979-543-2362 or Kashara Bell at 979-532-3310.

Cooking for a Lifetime is a cancer prevention cooking school program presented by the Family and Consumer Science Unit of Prairie View A&M University’s Cooperative Extension Program.

Prairie View A&M University has partnered with the University of Georgia to increase cancer prevention in the rural south. The Family and Consumer Science Unit of Prairie View A&M University will facilitate a research-based program to increase awareness of the importance of cancer screening and prevalence of various types of cancers.

Soil Testing Campaign Through Nov 2

AgriLife Extension – Wharton and Matagorda County – Offering Soil Testing Campaign now through November 2nd

By Corrie Bowen
County Extension Agent
Wharton County

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension – Wharton and Matagorda County Offices is offering soil testing for forage producers such as hay and improved grazing pastures.

This special multi-county Soil Testing Campaign will take place now through November 2, 2018.

Forage producers can gear up for next year’s growing season by soil sampling now to determine the status of soil nutrients in hay fields and pastures.

With soil testing, you can actually see what you’re deficient in and how much you need to supplement your hay field or pasture.

The objective in sampling is to obtain composite samples of soil that represent the entire area to be fertilized or limed.

For every 40 acres you will take a number of samples at a depth of 6”, probably at least 10-15 samples over that 40-acre area so we can get a random sample from a lot of different spots. They are mixed together, and the analysis will be taken from a combined soil sample.

Soil testing is a critical tool for farmers and ranchers. Applying fertilizer without a current soil test is sure to cost in either over application or under production.

Soil testing offers farmers a proven means of evaluating soil nutrient levels and provides guidelines to help set fertilizer rates and application methods to achieve desired production levels.  As a general rule, warm-season grasses require about 50 pounds of nitrogen, 15 pounds of phosphorus, and 42 pounds of potassium per ton of dry matter produced. If we’re removing 1 ton of hay per acre in a hay production scenario, and we’re not returning the 50 lbs of N, 15 lbs of P,and 42 lbs of K to the soil, then we can quickly see the field become deficient in these nutrients.  The lack of an appropriate fertility program may be the number one cause for bermudagrass decline.

Forage producers must first obtain soil sample bags and instructions from the Wharton or Matagorda County AgriLife Extension Office. After collecting composite samples, participants then select the proper test and complete the information sheet, which can be returned to the AgriLife Extension county office for a 33 percent discount on the testing fee and free shipping.  Soil samples with the complete sample form must be returned to the Wharton or Matagorda County Extension Office by 5:00 p.m. on November 2nd.

The Routine analysis tests for pH, nitrates, conductivity, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and sulfur, while the Routine + micronutrients tests for zinc, iron, copper and manganese.

Soil samples will be analyzed by the Texas A&M University Soils Testing Laboratory for a reduced fee of $8 per sample for the Routine analysis and $15 per sample for the Routine + micronutrients test during this special campaign.  Checks can be made payable to Leadership Advisory Board.

Once the kits are dropped off at the Wharton or Matagorda County Extension Office, the test samples will then be delivered to Texas A&M University-College Station by AgriLife Extension staff members.

For more information on this soil testing campaign, please contact Stacey at the Wharton County Extension Office at 979-532-3310.  Additional information on how to collect a soil sample, go to http://forages.tamu.edu/PDF/Soiltesting-E-534.pdf

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Corrie Bowen, MS
County Extension Agent – Agriculture
Wharton County
315 E. Milam, Suite 112
Wharton, Texas 77488
(979) 532-3310

Zone 3 Cotton Stalk Destruction Deadline Oct 31

Zone 3 Cotton Stalk Destruction Deadline October 31

By Corrie Bowen
County Extension Agent
Wharton County

A recent recommendation for a change to the Zone 3 pest management zone was considered by the Texas Department of agriculture, as approved by a majority vote of the Zone 3 Cotton Producer Advisory Committee.  This change in Zone 3 and the respective cotton stalk destruction date became effective on September 13, 2018.  These changes are reflected in the Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 20 Cotton Pest Control  http://texasagriculture.gov/Portals/0/images/ACP/Cotton/Ch20Cotton_2018-09-13.pdf

 

The Zone 3 Pest Management and Cotton Stalk Destruction Zone now comprises the following Texas Counties:  Austin, Brazoria, Chambers, Colorado, Fayette, Fort Bend, Galveston, Gonzales, Harris, Jackson, Jefferson, Lavaca, Liberty, Matagorda, Orange, Waller and Wharton. The cotton stalk destruction date for these Zone 3 counties is October 31st.  The mission of the Cotton Stalk Destruction program is to suppress boll weevil and pink bollworm populations in Texas.  For more details on the TDA Cotton Stalk Destruction regulatory program go to

http://www.texasagriculture.gov/RegulatoryPrograms/CottonStalkDestruction.aspx

From the destruction deadline of October 31st until the end date for destruction requirements (new cotton crop emergence), all cotton plants in  Pest Management Zone 3 shall be non-hostable.

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Corrie Bowen, MS
County Extension Agent – Agriculture
Wharton County
315 E. Milam, Suite 112
Wharton, Texas 77488
(979) 532-3310