2018 Corn and Grain Sorghum Performance Trial Results Available

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2018 Corn and Grain Sorghum Performance Trial Results Available

 

By Corrie Bowen
County Extension Agent
Wharton County

 

The 2018 Texas A&M AgriLife Research/Extension corn and grain sorghum performance trial results are now available online, at http://varietytesting.tamu.edu

The 2018 Corn Performance Trial included 33 commercial and experimental corn varieties.  This trial was conducted on the Clint and Larry Kalina Farm in Wharton County on a Clemville-Norwood Complex soil.  The 2018 crop year was an abnormally dry year, and yields certainly depended on when and where the rain fell.  The site of the 2018 Corn Trial reported 18.86” of precipitation.  In contrast, the National Weather Service at the Wharton County Aiport reported only 12.53 inches of rainfall during the growing season.

The 2018 Grain Sorghum Performance Trial included 35 commercial and experimental grain sorghum varieties.  This trial was conducted on the Mikel Brothers Farm in Damon, Texas on a Lake Charles Clay soil.  2018 grain sorghum yields were negatively impacted by the heat and lack of rainfall.  However, some areas did get rain.  The site of the 2018 Grain Sorghum Trial reported 28.13” of precipitation, and the yields certainly reflect the rainfall that they were fortunate to receive in the Damon, Texas area.

We’ll have additional data coming to you on the eight variety Uniform Corn and Grain Sorghum Variety Trials (aka County Plots) that were conducted in Colorado, Wharton, Fort Bend, Jackson, Matagorda, and Calhoun County.

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Corrie Bowen, MS
County Extension Agent – Agriculture
Wharton County
315 E. Milam, Suite 112
Wharton, Texas 77488
(979) 532-3310

Wharton County Career Development 101 Impact

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Will  you be ready to jump back into the work force after your released? Don’t know where to start? Need resume help? Work force wardrobe assistance? These were the questions that we asked the inmates in the Wharton County Jail. So, of course their answer was YES! Every Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. Prairie View A&M University Cooperative Extension taught 6 sessions of Career Development 101 at the Wharton County Jail. This class was offered to males and females inmates. During the series the participates had mock interviews, created a vision board and presented it, learned how to compete in the work force world, and how to to dress for interviews.  The work force world is challenging and constantly innovating. Gearing these participates up with top notch professional skills will set them apart  from all other applicants. Our class decreased over the course because of transfers, release dates, and disciple restrictions, but everything ended up working at in the end.  As a reward for completing the series, each inmate received a professional resume and a certificate. They were so excited! I would like to thank Sabrina Simon, Captain Mican, and the guards at Wharton County Jail. We couldn’t have done this without their support and hospitality.

 

 

Kashara L. Bell
Extension Agent, Wharton County
Prairie View A&M University Cooperative Extension Program
Family & Community Health
315 E. Milam St., Suite 112
Wharton, TX 77488
p: (979) 532-3371 | f: (979) 532-8863
kashara.bell@ag.tamu.edu

Ground Applications of 2,4-D Allowable by Permit beginning Sep 1

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Ground Applications of 2,4-D Allowable by Permit beginning September 1st

 

By Corrie Bowen
County Extension Agent
Wharton County

 

The Texas Department of Agriculture has granted the suspension of a rule regarding the application dates of 2,4-D in Wharton County – Section 7.53(oo)(1) and (2) of the special provisions for Wharton County of the Texas Pesticide Laws and Regulations.  The suspension allows for the ground application of 2,4-D and 2,4-D containing herbicides by permit on the west side of the Colorado River in Wharton County beginning on Saturday, September 1, 2018.    Ground applications of 2,4-D on the east side of the Colorado River in Wharton County are already permissible under rule 7.53(oo)(1).  All other applicable rules for Wharton County continue in effect.  Pesticide applicators are urged to pay special attention to 7.53(oo)(4) “In no case shall 2,4-D be used to treat any area that is nearer than two miles to any susceptible crop”.  Pay close attention that this rule suspension granted by TDA only allows the application of 2,4-D by ground application only beginning September 1st.  The aerial application of 2,4-D in Wharton county continues to be prohibited until September 15th on the east side of the Colorado River and  until October 1st on the West side of the Colorado River.  Also note in rule 7.50 (b) (3) that the use of any turbine or blower-type ground application equipment to apply regulated herbicides is prohibited.

 

Also, in a regulated county such as Wharton County, no person shall spray regulated herbicides (2,4-D, dicamba, MCPA, or quinclorac) when the wind velocity exceeds 10 miles per hour or as specified on the product label, if the label is more restrictive.  Regulated Herbicide Spray Permit applications are available at the Wharton Co. Extension Office, or by logging-on at http://texasagriculture.gov/Portals/0/forms/PEST/Applicator/spraypermitq820.pdf

TDA Pesticide license holders are required to submit a regulated herbicide spray permit when 2,4-D, dicamba, MCPA, or quinclorac will be sprayed in a regulated county.  The submission of the regulated spray permit pertains  to 2,4-D, but also when spraying dicamba, MCPA, or quinclorac in Wharton County.  Completed Regulated Herbicide Spray Permit applications can be faxed to the TDA Regional Office in Houston at (888) 223-5606.

 

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Corrie Bowen, MS
County Extension Agent – Agriculture
Wharton County
315 E. Milam, Suite 112
Wharton, Texas 77488
(979) 532-3310

 

August USDA Crop Acreage Report Confirms Local Planting Trends for 2018

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August’s USDA Crop Acreage Report Confirms local planting trends for 2018

By Corrie Bowen
County Extension Agent
Wharton County

 

Farm Service Agency policy requires that producers participating in several programs submit an annual report regarding all cropland use on their farms. These programs include Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC). Reporting also applies to those who receive marketing assistance loans or loan deficiency payments. Failure to file an accurate and timely acreage report for all crops and land uses can result in loss of program benefits. Producers are required to self report all cropland on each farm to FSA annually. FSA uses these data to determine payment eligibility (land must be in an eligible agricultural use to qualify for payments) and to calculate losses for various disaster programs. Data are reported in the following categories: planted; prevented planted; and failed. In addition, the National Agricultural Statistics Service uses FSA planted acreage data to complement their survey data.

USDA Farm Services  crop acreage data for the 2018 crop year was first posted on August 10, 2018.  Updates will be will be released on the following dates:  Sept 12th, Oct. 11th, Nov 8th, and again in January.  USDA-FSA posts these acreage reports at: https://www.fsa.usda.gov/news-room/efoia/electronic-reading-room/frequently-requested-information/crop-acreage-data/index

Every year I get asked just how many acres of each crop was planted in Wharton County.  Each year we have an idea from surveys and other sources, but to know the exact number I  have to wait for USDA to release their crop acreage data beginning in August.  For example, we knew cotton was going to be up in 2017, and by seed orders we knew to expect an increase in total cotton acres in 2018.  The Prospective Planting Report released on March 29, 2018 indicated that nationwide cotton acreage in 2018 would be up 7% (National Cotton Council predicted up 3.7%); corn acreage down 2%; and soybean acreage down 1%.  So let’s take a look at the local planted acreage numbers from the August 10th crop acreage report for 2018 and see how Wharton County stacks up to the national prospects at the beginning of the year.  The numbers are interesting!

For 2018 Wharton County reports 89,801 acres of cotton, which is up 13% from 2017’s 79,271 acres; 69,174 acre of corn, which is down 7% from 2017’s 74,688 planted acres; 19,767 acres of grain sorghum, which is down 3% from 2017’s 20,444 planted acres; 16,532 acres of soybeans is down 13% from 2017’s 19,175 acres; and rice in 2018 is reported at 37,187.9 acres  in Wharton County, up 3% from 2017’s 35,975 acres.  However, the Texas Rice Crop Survey (https://beaumont.tamu.edu/CropSurvey/CropSurveyReport.aspx) currently reports that 2018’s rice acreage in Wharton County is 38,602, up 7.6% from 2017’s 35,892 acres of rice.  USDA’s 2018 crop acreage report also shows an additional 3,871 acres of rice intended for seed this year.  Maybe we see this number change as USDA updates their acreage report in the coming months?

Matagorda County cotton acres shows to be up 37% over 2017 acreage; corn acres down 37% from 2017.  Jackson county cotton acres shows to be up 63% over 2017 acreage; corn acres down 24%.  I decide to take a look at how much more cotton we have in 2018 in the three county area of Wharton, Matagorda, and Jackson Counties combined.  The answer is…..54,202 more acres of cotton in 2018 than in 2017!  And as it relates to corn acres, we have 36,262 fewer acres of corn in this three county area than we did in 2017.

There could be many reasons why we have seen such an increase in cotton acres in our area, but the short of it is that crop producers simply sought more profit potential from cotton this year than from producing corn.   These numbers simply verify our local planting trends for 2018 and that our local acres vary significantly from the national trends.  Cotton prices are expected to remain strong in 2019.  Does this mean that we’ll see more cotton acres in 2019?  Economics will certainly weigh heavy next year in cropping decisions to be made, yet crop rotation is still a vital part of the full, sustainable agronomic picture – providing reduced disease pressure, fewer weeds, less insect damage, and improved nutrient levels.

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Corrie Bowen, MS
County Extension Agent – Agriculture
Wharton County
315 E. Milam, Suite 112
Wharton, Texas 77488
(979) 532-3310

 

Cotton Stalk Destruction – What’s New in 2018

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Cotton Stalk Destruction – What’s New for 2018

 

By Corrie Bowen

County Extension Agent

Wharton County

 

Cotton stalk destruction is a topic of research that has been evaluated for a good 20 to 25 years.   Herbicides have been applied to conventional and Roundup Ready Cotton, focusing on the traditional active ingredients such as 2,4-D and dicamba. The gold standard has been applying 1 quart/acre of a 4lb/gallon a.i. 2,4-D amine product  immediately afterwards through two weeks after shredding stalks.  This practice has yielded better than 90% control for decades.

With an increase in adoption of the dicamba and/or 2,4-D tolerant cotton varieties in 2017 and 2018 and with harvest upon us, chemical selection for cotton stalk destruction is a current topic of discussion. For Enlist, (2,4-D tolerant) cotton, 2,4-D is no longer an option to chemically destroy cotton stalks.

Stalk Destruction Options for Enlist Cotton

For cotton growers with Enlist (2,4-D tolerant) cotton, they will now have the choice of using either dichlorprop or dicamba to control cotton stalks.  I received word on July 25th from TDA that a 24(c) Special Local Need label has been approved for a dichlorprop-containing product called Duplosan by NuFarm. ( see attached file).  This product will be equally effective on cotton varieties with the XtendFlex or Glytol LibertyLink traits.  Data compiled by  AgriLife Extension shows that this product will be more effective than dicamba for controlling Enlist cotton.   The Duplosan label calls for a use rate of 32-48 fl oz/acre.  Make notice that when using Duplosan for cotton stalk destruction, Duplosan should be applied to cotton stalks with some leaf regrowth.  Applications of Duplosan made to freshly mowed stalks may be less effective.   Please note that Duplosan is an ester formulation, so special care will need to be taken if susceptible plants are nearby as volatilization is likely.  Also note that this product is a state limited use pesticide, thus you must be a licensed pesticide applicator or be working under the direct supervision of a licensed applicator to purchase or apply this product.  What does Duplosan cost per acre?  I did a little research, getting quotes from only two local distributors.  Approximate cost is $39.60 per gallon.  With the labeled use rates, this equates to $9.90 to $14.85 per acre for Duplosan.

Stalk Destruction Options for Xtendflex Cotton Varieties

For Xtendflex (dicamba tolerant) cotton varieties, the old gold standard of 2,4-D amine is still a valid option for cotton stalk destruction, costing generally less than $5.00 per acre for 2,4-D amine.   To obtain optimum results, cotton stalks should be shredded (6 to 8 inch height) and the spray application made soon after shredding. Best results are achieved if the herbicide is applied the same day as the shredding operation.  The first application should be at the rate of one pound of active ingredient per acre (for example, 1 quart of a 4 lb/gallon formulation). Generally, a second application of 0.5 to 1.0 pound active ingredient per acre will be necessary to control live stalks and emerged cotton seedlings.

To achieve optimum effectiveness, some growers have mounted spray booms directly on their flail shredders and banding the herbicide during the shredding operation, and achieving excellent results. Thorough coverage is essential, and should be in the range of 5 to 10 gallons of water per acre. Also, the addition of surfactant at the rate of 0.5 percent v/v (2 quarts per 100 gallons of water) is recommended. In a 2010 study conducted at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center, there was essentially no difference in killing re-growing cotton plants with 2,4-D between treating shredded stalks or those or left standing.  We also  know from previous research that waiting 21 days after shredding cotton stalks has not been as effective with 2,4-D.

2,4-D Application by Ground Application allowable September 1, 2018

The Texas Department of Agriculture has granted the suspension of a rule regarding the application dates of 2,4-D in Wharton County – Section 7.53(oo)(1) and (2) of the special provisions for Wharton County of the Texas Pesticide Laws and Regulations.  The suspension allows for the ground application of 2,4-D and 2,4-D containing herbicides by permit on the west side of the Colorado River in Wharton County beginning on Saturday, September 1, 2018.    Ground applications of 2,4-D on the east side of the Colorado River in Wharton County are already permissible under rule 7.53(oo)(1).  All other applicable rules for Wharton County continue in effect.  Pesticide applicators are urged to pay special attention to 7.53(oo)(4) “In no case shall 2,4-D be used to treat any area that is nearer than two miles to any susceptible crop”.  Pay close attention that this rule suspension granted by TDA only allows the application of 2,4-D by ground application only beginning September 1st.  The aerial application of 2,4-D in Wharton county continues to be prohibited until September 15th on the east side of the Colorado River and until October 1st on the West side of the Colorado River.  Also note in rule 7.50 (b) (3) that the use of any turbine or blower-type ground application equipment to apply regulated herbicides is prohibited.

Also, in a regulated county such as Wharton County, no person shall spray regulated herbicides (2,4-D, dicamba, MCPA, or quinclorac) when the wind velocity exceeds 10 miles per hour or as specified on the product label, if the label is more restrictive.  Regulated Herbicide Spray Permit applications are available at the Wharton Co. Extension Office, or by logging-on at http://texasagriculture.gov/Portals/0/forms/PEST/Applicator/spraypermitq820.pdf

TDA Pesticide license holders are required to submit a regulated herbicide spray permit when 2,4-D, dicamba, MCPA, or quinclorac will be sprayed in a regulated county.  The submission of the regulated spray permit pertains to 2,4-D, but also when spraying dicamba, MCPA, or quinclorac in Wharton County.  Completed Regulated Herbicide Spray Permit applications can be faxed to the TDA Regional Office in Houston at (888) 223-5606.

228-742_Duplosan_Herbicide_2.5_gal_RV070918_15390000

Duplosan (228-742) SLN TX-180005 Cotton Destruct (2)

 

Corrie Bowen, MS
County Extension Agent – Agriculture
Wharton County
315 E. Milam, Suite 112
Wharton, Texas 77488
(979) 532-3310