Cotton Turn Row Meeting July 17

Wharton – AgriLife Extension to host a Cotton Turn Row Meeting – July 17th

 

By Corrie Bowen

County Extension Agent

Wharton County

 

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, Wharton and Matagorda County Offices will host a Cotton Turn Row Meeting on Tuesday, July 17, 2018 in Wharton.  Registration will begin at the Directors Room at the Wharton County Fairgrounds at 8:30 a.m.  Program to begin at 9:00 a.m. with an overview of the 2018  Cotton Crop.  We’ll then proceed to our Replicated Agronomic Cotton Evaluation (RACE) trial where we’ll hear from Dr. Gaylon Morgan, Extension Cotton Specialist with discussion on cotton varieties and late season issues.  Dr. Scott Nolte, Extension Weed Specialist will follow with discussion on minimizing off-target herbicide movement.  By 11 a.m. we’ll return to the Directors Room where Greg Baker with discuss Worker Protection Standard requirements for pesticide workers and handlers.

 

The WPS is a federal regulation originally enacted in 1992 designed to protect agricultural workers (people involved in the production of agricultural plants) and pesticide handlers (people mixing, loading, or applying pesticides or doing other tasks involving direct contact with pesticides). You probably need to comply with the WPS if you are a:  Manager or owner of a farm, forest, nursery, or greenhouse; or Labor contractor for a farm, forest, nursery, or greenhouse; or  Custom (for hire) pesticide applicator or independent crop consultant hired by a farm, forest, nursery, or greenhouse operator.  The EPA made significant revisions to the WPS provisions that became effective January 2, 2018.  Most WPS provisions are protections that you, as an employer, must provide for your own employees and, in some instances, to yourself. The WPS covers two types of employers, which it defines according to the type of work their employees do.  Bring your farm employees (agricultural workers and/or pesticide handlers) to the July 17th Turn-Row meeting, as the WPS training at 11 a.m. will satisfy the annual WPS training.  The WPS training video will be provided in English.  Please contact the Wharton County Extension office prior to July 17th at 979-532-3310 if you have employees attending who will need to view the Spanish version of the WPS training.

 

Program will conclude at noon.  3 CEUs will be offered for TDA pesticide license holders and 3 CCA credits have been applied for.  Please call the Extension Office by  5:00 p.m. on July 16 just to let us know that you’ll be attending.  A flyer  for the July 17th turn-row meeting is available at https://wharton.agrilife.org

 

 

The members of Texas A&M AgriLife will provide equal opportunities in programs and activities, education, and employment to all persons regardless of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, genetic information, veteran status, sexual orientation or gender identity and will strive to achieve full and equal employment opportunity throughout Texas A&M AgriLife. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating.  Individuals with disabilities who require an auxiliary aid, service or accommodation in order to participate in any Extension activity, are encouraged to contact the County Extension Office for assistance 5 days prior to the activity.

 

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Did recent rains come too late for the South Texas cotton crop?

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Did recent rains come too late for the South Texas cotton crop?

by Josh McGinty and Gaylon Morgan, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

The 2018 season in South Texas has been a tough one. In southernmost areas, a dry winter and spring meant planting moisture was scarce, while excessive rainfall was a common problem that delayed field preparation and planting in the Upper Gulf Coast. Since planting, excessive heat, wind, and very limited rainfall has been a common occurrence across South Texas, leading to severe moisture stress and early cutout (5 nodes above white flower) in many fields. Then on June 19-20, widespread and heavy rainfall (6-10 inches) occurred across South Texas. With excessive soil moisture in the fields, the question now is whether or not our cotton crop will benefit from this late moisture and what should be done to manage this crop?

Bear in mind that cotton is a perennial plant that will resume growth and likely attempt to put on additional fruit. On the surface, this may sound like a good thing; however, we must consider whether or not it will be worth it to wait and manage for these later developing bolls. Today’s squares won’t become mature bolls for at least 70 days, and in many regions (especially those along the coast) waiting to harvest these bolls will place growers at greater risk of losing yield and lint quality due to tropical weather in August and September.

With the difficulties at harvest in the Upper Gulf Coast due to rain in 2016 and the disaster that was Hurricane Harvey still fresh in our memory, it is advisable to continue to manage the crop we have for a timely harvest in late July to August. Careful monitoring of plant growth and judicious use of plant growth regulators after these rains will be critical for keeping these plants at a manageable size for an efficient harvest. Some of the later planted or replanted cotton, especially up the coast, may be young enough to benefit from these rains, but we still need to be mindful of the increasing threat of tropical weather as we get further into the summer and early fall.

Josh McGinty
Assistant Professor & Extension Agronomist
Corpus Christi, TX
jmcginty@tamu.edu

 

Beef market, weather outlook to be featured at Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course

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Beef market, weather outlook to be featured at Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course

 

June 20, 2018

Media Contact: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu

Dr. Jason Cleere, 979-845-6931, jjcleere@tamu.edu

 

COLLEGE STATION – The outlook for consumer beef demand as well as price forecasts for the cattle market will be featured during the general session of the 64th Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course Aug. 6-8 at Texas A&M University in College Station.

The general session, set for Aug. 6, will feature Randy Blach, CEO of CattleFax, who will give a beef cattle market outlook.

The outlook for consumer beef demand as well as price forecasts for the cattle market will be featured during the general session of the 64th Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course Aug. 6-8 at Texas A&M University in College Station. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Blair Fannin)

“Everyone is wanting to know the trends and how this will affect marketing cattle for the remainder of the year,” said Dr. Jason Cleere, short course coordinator and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service beef cattle specialist, College Station. “Attendees will have the opportunity to hear a comprehensive overview of price trends and outlook so they can plan accordingly with their operations.”

Dr. Ron Gill, AgriLife Extension beef cattle specialist, College Station, will discuss hot issues in the cattle industry, including animal diseases traceability, clean meat and exports.

Dr. Jason Cleere, conference coordinator and AgriLife Extension beef cattle specialist, College Station, and Kelley Sullivan, co-owner of Santa Rosa Ranch near Houston, will provide a look at the China beef market — present and future.

Tiffany Dowell Lashmet, AgriLife Extension law specialist, Amarillo, will discuss landowner issues affecting ranchers, and Brian Bledsoe, Southern Livestock Standard weatherman, Pueblo, Colorado, will provide an extended weather outlook.

The short course is the largest beef cattle educational event in the country and attracts more than 1,800 beef cattle producers from Texas and abroad, according to organizers. The short course is hosted by AgriLife Extension and the department of animal science at Texas A&M.

The short course also features 22 sessions covering basic practices, new technologies and other important industry topics. These sessions provide participants an opportunity to choose workshops based on their level of production experience and the needs of their ranch.

“Concurrent workshops will feature information on forage and beef cattle management, health, nutrition and reproduction, record-keeping, genetics, purebred cattle and much more,” Cleere said. In addition to classroom instruction, participants can attend one of the program’s demonstrations on the morning of Aug. 8, he said.

“There will be demonstrations on live cattle handling, chute-side calf working, brush management, fence building, tractor safety and beef carcass value determination,” Cleere said.

“The goal of the short course each year is to provide the most cutting-edge information needed by beef cattle producers. We have information everyone can take home and apply to their operations.”

Participants can earn at least nine Texas Department of Agriculture pesticide continuing education units if they are already licensed, Cleere added.

An industry trade show, featuring more than 130 agricultural businesses and service exhibits, will also be held during the event.

“And the famous Texas Aggie Prime Rib Dinner is always a highlight of the short course,” Cleere said.

Registration is $210 and covers all meals, including the prime rib dinner, breaks and printed materials. To register, go to https://beefcattleshortcourse.com/.

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Corrie Bowen, MS

County Extension Agent – Agriculture

Wharton County

315 E. Milam, Suite 112

Wharton, Texas 77488

(979) 532-3310

 

44th Annual Rice Field Tour and Program at Eagle Lake

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June 26th – 44th Annual Rice Field Tour and Program  at Eagle Lake

 

By Corrie Bowen
County Extension Agent – Agriculture
Wharton County

 

The 44th Annual AgriLife Research Rice Field Tour and Program at Eagle Lake, Texas will be held on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 at the David R. Wintermann Rice Research Station, northwest of Eagle Lake off Hwy 102.  Field tours will begin at 4:00 pm, which will be followed by an evening program and dinner at the Eagle Lake Community Center.   All rice growers are invited to attend and view current research in rice production practices.   For Tickets call 979-234-3578.

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Corrie Bowen, MS

County Extension Agent – Agriculture

Wharton County

315 E. Milam, Suite 112

Wharton, Texas 77488

(979) 532-3310

 

Label and Use Reminder

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The Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) has received numerous calls this season regarding the possible drift of auxin herbicides.  TDA has requested AgriLife Extension’s assistance in distributing the attached label use reminder for ensuring that auxin herbicides stay on target.

The label and use reminder document can also be viewed on TDAs website at:

http://www.texasagriculture.gov/Portals/0/forms/COMM/LabelUse.pdf